Lucy Griffiths

All posts tagged Lucy Griffiths

Courtesy of NBC

Courtesy of NBC

We here at NotJustAnotherTVSite.com judge all major decisions on one primary criteria. Does it measure up to our expectation of quality? It seems simple enough. If it’s a show that we’ve decided to preview, promote, and cover episode to episode, you can rest assured the particular show in question maintains a certain level of quality. For the record, there have been shows that we have been over-the-moon excited for and ultimately decided that it’s time to walk away. Why? Because those shows failed to meet our quality expectation. NBC’s Constantine, is absolutely NOT one of those.

NBC’s choice to produce Constantine, and more importantly, this vision of Constantine was brave. NBC should be celebrated for that by the way. Like so many comic book adaptations pre-Marvel Cinematic Universe, were ‘adequate’. They were entertaining, but they were also made with the understanding that they had to be workable for most audiences, not just the comic book underworld. Spawn, Daredevil (2003), etc as comic book adapted movies were nice, but compared to today’s expectations would have fallen flat on their face. The comic book television landscape was even worse.

The point is that today’s audience does not need their show dumbed down or made palatable for all time zones. Constantine has done that. Constantine is born from the same genesis as Marvel’s MCU and recent successes as Netflix’s Daredevil. Do yourself a favor. Google Netflix Daredevil and read just some of the feedback. You’d think it was the highest rated show of the calendar year. The showrunners at NBC working on Constantine kept one very important detail constant. Tell the story from an adapted version of the comic books, Hellblazer. The 2003 Keanu Reeves feature was the product of Hollywood changing all of the incredible details in order to make a production that appeals to as many people and demographics as possible.

Appealing to mass demographics is good. High ratings are good. They help sell ad revenue. When I was in the radio industry, one thing was always made clear. All of it is window dressing if the end product doesn’t bring in ad revenue. Ad revenue was literally what kept the lights on. Not to sound too idealistic, but NBC can make its money from their heavy hitters. I began this article by citing quality. Now anyone who knows anything about TV knows there is a direct and inverse relationship between numbers and quality more often than not. NBC is still going to make a killing from shows like Law and Order and Celebrity Apprentice. Every now and then the two powers of ‘quality’ and ‘are they watching’ converge perfectly. The Blacklist is a great example of that. The Blacklist is an incredible show and people are watching it. In the case of Constantine, it was playing against stacked odds from the beginning.

Courtesy of Vertigo/DC Comics

Courtesy of Vertigo/DC Comics

Let’s address the elephant in the room. Placing a comic book adaptation show that the vast majority of viewers are not familiar with late on a Friday night was borderline criminal. Comic book adaptations draw, period. Maybe this is a ‘strike while the iron’s hot’ situation, but it is true and really not up for debate. Next to no one watches television on a Friday night, and they definitely don’t do it live. Putting them on Friday nights, then graciously moving them up in the time slot but keeping them on Friday nights, put Constantine behind the eight ball and NBC knows that. This is 30 Rock vs Studio 60 all over again. Anyone with an objective eye could look at the first few episodes of Studio 60 and the first few episodes of 30 Rock and know without question, Studio 60 was the better show. Without a good time slot and promotion, better shows are going to continue to fall.

Promotion is another factor that had Constantine playing catch up. Before NBC rolled out The Blacklist, every American knew this show was going to be big. All because of promotion. There were promos and trailer for The Blacklist everywhere. On sports broadcasts, on shows that had no relation or connection at all. Spader was out there. The Blacklist was going to be successful because it had the full weight and support of the network. Constantine was never given that opportunity. You cannot produce a show based on a comic book very few people have any real familiarity with and just let people stumble upon it and hope it takes off. It doesn’t work that way.

The last detail I’ll get into before talking specifics about the show, is audience. Not everyone is going to “Get It”. If the aim is to maximize viewership by making something that will appeal to everyone in the same way, make nothing but what some call “Lowest Common Denominator” television. Keep cranking out Law and Order, Chicago Fire, Parks and Recreation. There is a large and growing audience that wants no part of L.C.D. programming. To some of us, procedural is a four letter word. And in this “DVR Era” we, the viewer, can afford to be more choosy of what we watch and we get to dictate when we watch it. Now I have no idea if the ratings system has accounted for the current television era where the DVR has completely changed the way we watch television. Side note to television networks. I watch and obscene amount of television. Yet, I have not watched a non-sporting event (or game broadcast) live in almost 7 years. I sincerely hope you are taking that into account. Especially when you put a great show on Friday nights.

At the end of the day, you have the audience that will watch Bones, Big Bang Theory, CSI: Whatever, Survivor, Glee, etc and you are going to have the audience that has no interest in predictable, safe television. Serialized, big story arcs, sympathetic characters facing unbelievable trials is just more compelling to some than others. That my friends, is the difference. Ratings can no longer be a race to first. These networks need to start evaluating success and failure by two different groups at the same time. Take a look around the television landscape. It is getting very competitive. We really are experiencing a television and cinematic renaissance. You just have to navigate through the mountains of garbage to find it. If networks like NBC are going to continue to grade shows like Constantine under the same criteria as The Voice or Bad Judge, then another elite show is going to fall by the wayside. It’s not the same type of television and they cannot continue to paint all of these shows with the same brush.

Constantine is great. End of discussion. For anyone who has not yet seen it, take my word for it, Constantine is one of the better shows of the calendar year, regardless of network or time slot. That said, it did not start out that way. A large component in that again goes back to promotion by NBC, or lack thereof. If NBC had titled the show “Hellblazer” or ran far more promotion illustrating that this show was not going to be the story released in 2003 starring Keanu Reeves, then expectation and therefore results might have been different. They made very few attempts to convey that. So, most people went in with a certain expectation, which was not met.

The pilot episode on its own merits is alright and had the show continued on that trajectory, I would not be writing this piece now. By my expectations, the pilot episode was bad. Bad as in significantly underwhelming. So much so (again just my opinion) that I actually called up a colleague at the website to inform him I would not be posting a recap, but a ‘here’s what’s wrong with it’ piece. Thankfully, the consensus was to do just that, but leave room just in case they right the ship. The second episode is 100% better. By the time we are introduced to Papa Midnite, we’re off to the races and the show is exactly what it was supposed to be. Dark, intriguing, compelling, ever-changing, straddling the line between angels and demons lore and the plot plausibility. This is the problem.

The pilot episode feels like it had NBC’s Standards and Practices grubby little hands all over it. The pilot was bright and warm by comparison to the later episodes. When doing a comic book adaptation, visual texture is key. There is a reason The Dark Knight and Arrow were so wildly successful. You cannot produce a show like Constantine with that bright, bubbly sort of way. Thankfully the showrunners for Constantine were able to come back to their base and it begins with texture. Visual interpretation. Again, never more clear than the first introduction to Papa Midnite. By episode four, Constantine was must see TV. However, not many were watching it because the show stumbled out of the gate. If they were to run the show we came to build a strong affection for and aired it on Monday, Tuesday, or Thursday in primetime the results would have absolutely been different.

Courtesy of NBC

Courtesy of NBC

Constantine may be a show or story about angels, demons, magic and one man in the middle of all of it, but it is very much character driven. Characters are the vehicle to success. Every single significant character is sympathetic and compelling. From there, all they have to do is tell the story. The story from the perspective of the comic book adaptation, not a major networks softer, lighter version of that story.

As it stands now, Constantine ended on a MASSIVE cliffhanger. Probably the biggest season finale reveal I’ve seen in a few years. I remember it clearly. Watching as the clock ticked down, I was certain I knew what would happen next and how the episode and season would conclude. When people say, “I had to pick my jaw up off the floor” it’s always blanketed in hyperbole. Now my jaw may not have been on the floor, but I easily could have caught a family of insects with how wide and long my mouth was open at the final moments of the season finale.

There are still very important details yet to be dealt with. Big, incredible, trajectory altering details. To drop this show now, simply put, would be irresponsible. Look, I understand that NBC is still a business that has to deem a certain show profitable. I don’t think anyone is naive to that concept, but there are three hugely important concepts that I fear NBC is not even considering. 1. They put Constantine in a position to fail before it even began-not the show’s fault, 2. The audience they are trying to reach is not the Law and Order crowd, and 3. Sometimes a show is just flat-out better than others that create more revenue. You could not pay me to watch Celebrity Apprentice or The Slap. Sometimes the better, higher quality show should just win the day. On the merits of quality. Not because it makes more money, but because it is just a better product.

Here’s the kicker. It is my opinion that Constantine has not developed a consistent form of high ratings…YET. Move the show to a more appealing time slot and let people figure it out. One of my favorite quotes in all of television history (ironically from a show cancelled way too soon) is:

“I believe the people who watch television shows are not dumber that the people who make television shows. I believe that quality is not an anathema to profit.” -Jordan McDeere (Studio 60 Live On The Sunset Strip)

American television viewers are not dumb. They have the wherewithal to handle and in fact embrace a wide range of concepts and delivery methods. Despite popular belief, this country is not filled with Honey Boo Boo and Kardashian enthusiasts. We the viewers long for shows that push the envelope. That breach concepts and topics we haven’t embraced before. We want to empathize and build affection for characters. We want to feel like we have ‘experienced’ something from our TV watching time. We are in a different era of modern television. It’s about time NBC and other major networks got on board with this idea. Constantine does not need to be their bread-winner. It only needs to continue being what it is. One of the top 10 best shows on television. I don’t care what the ratings indicate. Give it a better time slot and let the showrunners, cast and crew do their jobs. The numbers will come. You just have to get out-of-the-way and let it happen.

If you’re a fan of Constantine, help spread the word. It is my understanding that showrunner, Mr. Daniel Cerone is set to pitch season 2 to NBC at the end of this month (April) beginning of next (May). And it seems NBC is willing to listen to fan outcry. So let’s do just that. We live in a new world. Utilize it. Access your Twitter account, your Facebook account, email NBC directly. Do whatever you must to explicitly and without any confusion articulate to NBC that they CANNOT let this one go. They cannot walk away from this show. And that it is not in their best interests to let Constantine die. The best shows available still only make up less than 10% of what’s out there. We cannot lose this one. Whether your efforts are here with us at NJATVS, social media or directly on NBC’s lap, take the time to support this effort. Use the established #saveconstantine or the more direct #renewconstantine and show those in charge that this show has a following, it’s larger than they think, and we will continue to support this series.

If you have not yet seen Constantine season 1, or feel you somehow missed out and need to give it another shot, NBC starting today Friday April 24th, will make the entirety of season 1 available to stream on their website for a limited time. Go to NBC.com (or the NBC app) and discover it for the first time or revisit it again. I don’t know if streaming numbers for this limited run is a test balloon or not. What I do know is that it’s worth watching, even if all that does is send NBC a message.

I can count on one hand the number of current shows that I would bang my fist against the table for. Constantine is one of them. The show did not get a fair shake and was judge by unbalanced criteria. Do your part to help the people who put this show together. Save Constantine. Make sure NBC knows they NEED to Renew Constantine.

#saveconstantine #renewconstantine

#saveconstantine #renewconstantine

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros studios

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros studios

Warning: Spoiler Alert

(For both television series and the 2005 Theatrical release)

Here at NJATVS we strive to bring our viewers entertaining content that pertains to television programs of a certain quality. Before each new television season we carefully take a look at the upcoming shows, both new and returning. Then we decide on what we will cover based on what we deem to satisfactorily meet our quality standards. We are not critics. We are not going to cover a show for the duration of its run just so that we can rip a show weekly. It is not our intention to come across smug and superior to those creating the television shows.

On occasion we will start a show and eventually decided that it’s execution does not meet our standards. Instead of using our time to rip the show, we will politely and share our reasons and walk away. I’m sure there are plenty of sites out there more than happy to be a festival of negativity at a particular show’s expense. That is not our intention, so let me share with you the rationale for our less than good reaction to the debut of NBC’s Constantine.

First off, we need to set some guidelines and perspectives. Constantine is a television adaptation of the DC comic book “Hellblazer”. In 2005, there was a theatrical version starring Keanu Reeves and Rachel Weisz that has a remarkable following called Constantine. So this gives us three distinct perspectives. You are either a devoted fan of the comic book series Hellblazer, a fan of the movie Constantine, or a new viewer with a context of either.

One of the worst social experiences with television and movies is when you hear someone say, “the book was better”. The one acceptable exception is when dealing with comic books. Comic books tend to reveal a very specific type of story. Within which are endless details. Details that the comic book community are big sticklers for.

The cinematic realm is more visual. Even if the story is incredible, but the visual is unimpressive, the story will ultimately be considered just adequate. Sure, romance movies and comedies are a little different. On screen, movie or television, the imagery needs to convey a certain look and texture. If Game of Thrones didn’t work really diligently to create the world their characters live in, it would not be remotely as popular.

Lastly, those who are interested in the concept of a show. I personally, really enjoyed the concept of the show Intelligence. The execution however, was significantly lacking and after the first few weeks, began to lose viewers at a steady rate. The concept of Constantine is impressive. If this is new to you, by all means, Google it. It would take entirely too long to break that down for you here and now. The very short version is that Constantine is a mortal man who (depending on which previous version you’re coming from) has the ability to return demons back to hell despite the fact that his own soul is destined to end up in hell. John Constantine feels compelled to do enough good (by sending said demons back to hell) that he hopes he can earn his way back into heaven.

While I know that NBC’s Constantine is more likely to lean towards the Hellblazer comic version than the movie, you cannot have this discussion without bringing up the movie at every turn. The movie was a real departure from the comic books. Which is not always a bad thing. My biggest complaint stems from the idea that no matter where you fall on the story, the movie was better visually. And if we are comparing the movie directly to the pilot episode, it will feel like a college grad taking third grade spelling. At least visually. There is a tone, a texture, even a feeling when watching the movie. It has a grit that the television series apparently ignored. And before you think it, no the look of the television series is not better. Maybe cheaper, but not better.

Courtesy of Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of Warner Bros Studios

When we speak of the ‘look’ or the imagery, it is not limited to set designs and wardrobe. The color schemes are a wonderful contrast. For starters, the movie John wears the black and white suit (tie loosened) without fail. The TV John wears more of a variation of that with the trench coat. Nothing against trench coats, but it adds a third color into a monochromatic arrangement. And while that seems petty, consider the back drop. Everything else is in bold, dark or at least complimentary colors. The black and white creates a dramatic contrast.

Let me preface this part by saying that I understand we have not seen the characters yet to be unveiled in the television show. The primary characters are all very cool (for lack of a better term), except Gabriel in the movie version. John Constantine is a smug loner, whose soul is damned, has terminal cancer and is, dare I say, a tad emo about it. In the show, John is witty, snide, and almost matter of fact about his plight. While I enjoy Matt Ryan’s version of John, it lacks a depth and tone that worked very well for Keanu in the movie. Things like: ” Yeah, what kind of mental patient kills herself? That’s just crazy.” Are the sort of deadpan, snotty lines that people loved from the movie that this new John Constantine would never say.

Chas, Chas, Chas. In the show Chas is ‘an entity’. I cannot go much further than that with any certainty. The prevailing theory is that Chas didn’t die in the first episode because Chas wasn’t technically alive to begin with. Which is fine. If Chas is a supernatural in his own right and uses that to John’s advantage, then maybe that will be a cool dynamic. Going back to the film again, there was something great about the condescending, experienced, condemned to hell John Constantine mentoring (or using Chas to drive him around) a young, enthusiastic, apprentice who will get his first shot at the action no time soon. I see that the new Chas may prove to be a pivotal character, but does he have to be in his mid 30’s and viewed by John as a relative partner?

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Manny over Gabriel every day of the week and twice on Sundays. Some people, especially critics who don’t know their head from their –, believe that Tilda Swinson’s portrayal of Gabriel was the best part of the movie. I believe the opposite. Anyone, male or female, could have done a better job with Gabriel. I’m not head over heels for Manny, but without a doubt, the Manny character demolishes the Gabriel character. Put one in the win column for NBC’s Constantine.

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Papa Midnight. Sometimes a person comes along and lends themselves to a role that is what it is and it will not be topped. Papa Midnight was written and meant to be played for Djimon Hounsou. I don’t think it will be even close. No disrespect to Michael James Shaw, but those are massive shoes to fill. If they had gotten Idris Elba to play Midnight, maybe but even that is not a lock. There is a certain smoothness paired with a sense of power that is required. Midnight can be neutral because no one is going to challenge it. Midnight is an ally when it is convenient for him and the character must be played a certain way.

Courtesy of Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of Warner Bros Studios

Influencers, these are the demons or high-ranking soldiers for Satan that use influence, or in some cases direct contact to push human toward the wrong decision. In the movie the primary influencer was Balthazar (deliciously played by Gavin Rossdale, front man for Bush. Or so my wife tells me). A well put together demon in a meat suit. As we have not been introduced to any influencers as of yet, I will table any sort of verdict.

Demons in general. In the movie there are influencers who are demons but don’t get their hands messy, literally. Both when they are exposed through holy water and anything else during an exorcism, we see the true demon within. And even in the case of John taking a spirit walk through hell as part of the plot, we see an alternate version of the world as we know it populated by hunched over, trudging demons with the top of their skulls missing.

In the show what did the soldier demon look like? A bald man with no color in his eyes. Even Granny early in the episode was really no more imaginative than something you’d see in Sleepy Hollow or American Horror Story.

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Female leads. So let me get this straight. In the movie the female lead is a police detective (don’t undervalue that role) whose twin sister allegedly commits suicide, is the focus of a demonic possession, and will be the primary chip in John’s negotiation with the devil. In the show she is a rental car customer service rep? Seriously? In the movie the female lead brings previously gained skills and benefits to the team. In the show, the only benefit is that she’s someone’s daughter who may prove to be more valuable later. It should be noted that Angela Dobson and Liv Aberdine are in no way the same character.

It goes without saying that the movie tells a story while the TV show aims to tell a series of stories leading up to one big story. As far as the respective stories go, I’m good with either version. I think the TV show’s writing doesn’t touch the movie. Which isn’t really saying much as the movie isn’t winning any Screen Writers Guild awards. There are three specific factors to any endeavor such as this. The story, and I have confidence that writers will find their voice just fine. Character development, again, not a problem. I have to believe that there is more going on with the characters than what we’ve already seen. And lastly is imagery. I really don’t want to sound too harsh, but in the category of imagery, the TV series fails miserably. It’s almost as bad as if a major movie studio decided to do a big budget cinematic version of Phantom of the Opera, leaving out all of the music, put the character is business casual attire, and put it in present day New Jersey. Maybe that would appeal to some people, but to most it would be bad.

All of this comes back to imagery. Influencers that look exactly like humans until their iris changes to a slight red. Dark people wearing light colors (in lighting not race). Using similar tones in the actors appearance and their respective backdrops to give the illusion that they blend into their surroundings. Even the manner in which the ‘Johns’ execute their exorcism. Matt Ryan’s John gets loud and has a grasp of the skill, but still seems like he’s this close to losing control. Control is not an issue for Keanu Reeves’ John. Everything is deliberate. That John knows their moves before they make them. He has a grasp on everything even down to his own fate. He may still believe he can save his soul, but he’s mistaken about exactly how he can do that.

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of NBC and Warner Bros Studios

John: Haven’t I served him enough. What does he want from me?
Gabriel: Just the usual. Self sacrifice, belief…
John: Oh I believe for Christ sake.
Gabriel: No. No. You know. There’s a difference

Here’s the rub. The movie version of Constantine has grit, subtle details that really add to the story, lighting and color, varying degrees of emotion that play into most details, it is textured and compelling. The television series that debuted this week feels like a ‘monster of the week’ detective show for demons vs angels. One is epic and one has some intriguing features. Maybe, had they named the series “Hellblazer” there would be less comparing the TV series to the movie.  And for my money, I have seen nothing from the first episode that leads me to believe they will ever produce anything as visually dramatic, humorous, and compelling as the praying scene outside Midnight’s place.

Courtesy of Warner Bros Studios

Courtesy of Warner Bros Studios

All is not lost. Normally when we are significantly disappointed, that is the sign that we will be gracefully bowing out. And understand the thought did cross our minds. However, there have been real indications that NBC and the show runners are planning to shake things up a bit. A sense that while some enjoyed the pilot, more has to be done to retain viewers if not grow them. So we at NJATVS are going to watch and see what happens. I have some real issues with where it feels like this show is going. However, the show, series, and concept are too interesting to walk away from. We will do our due diligence to ensure that the right decision is applied to Constantine. In the meantime, I strongly suggest you look into the theatrical release if you have not already done so. If for no other reason than contrast. The 2005 release is available through Warner Brothers video and anywhere Blu-Ray and DVDs are sold.

Courtesy of NBC

Courtesy of NBC

Photo Courtesy Of NBC

Photo Courtesy Of NBC

Warning: Spoiler Alert

If you’ve ever seen the 2005 film “Constantine,” starring Keanu Reeves, about a man who could see demons and other assorted creatures not visible to most mortals, you’d be best to throw any expectations aside. The upcoming NBC series “Constantine” bears very little resemblance to the cult-movie including the title character. The network’s focusing on the connection instead, between the series and the DC comic “Hellblazer.” (a comic I’ve never read.) Welsh actor Matt Ryan plays John Constantine, who carries business cards describing him as an exorcist and master of the dark arts. We first meet John while receiving electro-shock therapy, at the “Ravenscar Psychiatric Facility for The Mentally Deranged,” which he checked himself into voluntarily.

Jason Jones’ will recap the season premiere episode when it airs in late October, so I don’t want to give away too much in this series preview.  However, there are certain pieces of knowledge you should know heading into this series, chief among them that this John Constantine, was not born bearing special abilities. He also never got to know his mother, who died giving birth to him, a fact that his father resented and told his son on a daily basis. He even had a special nickname for his child, whom he addressed as “Killer,” throughout his childhood. Constantine, mourning his mother became obsessed with the occult, hoping to contact his mother. Although he learned spells and bits of sorcery, he’s failed to connect with his mother.

John, checked himself into Ravenscar, after an exorcism he tried to perform went bad and he couldn’t deal with the emotional consequences. Hence the shock-therapy, which he uses desperately trying to erase the memories to no avail. Constantine wants the world to go away, but he fears death as he damned his own soul to Hell in the botched exorcism. Which is why he’s at Ravenscar, to forget and get away from society as well, but John soon finds reason to resume his old life.

Following a trail of cockroaches in the hospital, he follows them to a young female patient possessed by a demon and writing in blood on the walls of her room with the bugs swarming all over her work. Constantine’s able to expel the demon from the woman, then sees the demon left him a message, “LIV DI.”  He realizes a promise he made to an old friend’s being called in now and he checks himself out of the hospital and heads to Atlanta. There lives the daughter of his friend Jasper Winters, who actually was a “Seer,” able to see the demons and other creatures that hid from most humans, while holding an amulet. Winters died the year before with his daughter Liv Aberdeen (Lucy Griffiths) never meeting him, being told by her mother he died before she was born.

Once Liv possesses the amulet, she’s able to see exactly what her father could, scaring and exciting her. Constantine tells her that she’s being hunted by demons and the rest of the pilot’s based on getting the demon, before the demon got Liv.

I’ve never seen Matt Ryan previously, although he’s got a lengthy resume, but I liked his performance in the pilot. There’s a bit of a con-man in his makeup and though he tries pretending he’s got everything under control, his eyes give him away. Lucy Griffiths does a good job as Liv, starting out the episode an unfulfilled college-graduate, working as rental car agent. By the end of the pilot, she’s attempting to recruit Constantine, to travel the country with her, trying to rid the world of demons.

John’s “oldest mate” Chas Chandler, (Charles Halford) comes across as a man of action and few words, with extraordinary healing abilities. Tilda Swinton’s sexually ambiguous Angel Gabriel’s, not in the TV series. Instead we meet an Angel who calls himself Manny (Harold Perrineau) a Black man with gold eyes, who tells Constantine that he’s watching over him and could save his soul. Perrineau, who played castaway Michael on “Lost,”  gets reunited with Jeremy Davies, who played scientist Daniel Faraday on the series. Davies plays Richie Simpson, another expert on the occult who was with John at the exorcism that went awry and has to get convinced to work with Constantine again.

This is the season for comic-book based series, as fellow DC stars will appear in “Gotham” and CW will premiere the “Flash,” in October. NBC will pair their new series with veteran series Grimm on Friday nights. The network hopes to get better results than they did last season with freshman series “Dracula,” that had trouble getting out of the gate.

Constantine Premiers Friday October 24, at 10:00pm on NBC.