NJATVS Speculation

Photo Courtesy Of NBC

Photo Courtesy Of NBC

Warning: Spoiler Alerts

Allow me to escort you back to my childhood in the Mid-Sixties, an era in which TV series were far less complicated.  One of my favorite shows in my tween-years was an ABC series called “The Mod Squad.” The premise of the show revolved around three teenagers who ran afoul of the law and were given the choice of serving prison sentences, or becoming undercover cops. Needless to say the two young men and one young woman chose to serve the police and their commanding officer a no-nonsense cop named Captain Greer.

I clearly remember an episode in which one of the characters Lincoln Hayes gets shot in the opening scene and most of the hour consisted of flashbacks and the young man fighting for his life. Perhaps that hour remains embedded in my memory as it caused me to have a minor revelation. Hayes would naturally pull through as he co-starred in the series and the show had gained a loyal following. Of course in the final act of the episode Hayes opens his eyes and the team’s back at full strength by the next week.

The medium’s evolved over the past fifty-years and characters have gone from being these one-dimensional beings, many with little to no back-story. Each episode was self-contained, it was like playing a videogame that reset at the beginning each time you played it. Claire and Cliff Huxtable went from being the parents of four children in the first season of the “Cosby Show,” only to discover they actually had a full-grown daughter they somehow forgot about. Perhaps even stranger, Marion and Howard Cunningham completely forgot about their oldest son named Chuck on “Happy Days.” (I’ve always theorized that Chuck Cunningham left the States for Havana and became a right-hand man to Fidel Castro.)

We’ve also seen that the medium’s no longer as predictable as back in the era I grew up in as main characters now leave series to go onto other projects while others have passed on during a series run. Viewers and fans of the NBC series “The Blacklist,” have been on the edge of their collective seats after watching FBI informant Elizabeth Keen apparently die after giving birth to a daughter. The Internet’s filled with promotional photos displaying Liz’s funeral and headstone that will take place in the next episode. However in a series that’s utilized the fake-out and sleight of hand moves through its history, I firmly believe that the reports of Elizabeth Keen’s death have been greatly exaggerated.

Matias Solomon’s a “Super-Soldier,” however the operative word here’s soldier he’s a man that’s been trained to follow orders. He’s a mercenary in the truest sense of the word, his services belong to the highest bidder and he’s not saddled with baggage such as a conscience or values, that could cause him to turn down an assignment. His debut in the series showed us that he lacked mercy even for infants, infecting Dembe’s granddaughter with a deadly virus, which he eventually gave her the antidote for.

He’s not a bureaucrat he’s an extraordinarily intelligent killing-machine, a guy who if he possesses any emotions likely feels a high when he snuffs out a life. While he maybe at the top of the game in his profession, he’s not setting the agenda. The person who hires him does that and while watching Solomon die an excruciating death maybe cathartic for the fans, it still doesn’t stop the mission from advancing. Somebody wants Masha Rostova alive and unharmed and even if TEAM-Red could have stopped Solomon, somebody would soon take his place.

Let’s go back to the scene when everything went South, Lizzie had just given birth to her daughter Agnes via an emergency Caesarean procedure. Raymond asked permission to enter the makeshift operating room to see Tom and Lizzie’s little bundle of joy, but she refused saying she wanted Reddington to stay away from her daughter. The normally unflappable Red was in pure meltdown mode, having failed Lizzie and breaking the promise he made to keep her and her child safe.

As we approach the conclusion of third season of this series, we’re still pretty much clueless about the relationship between Kate Kaplan and Raymond. There’s been speculation that she could be his sister or another relative, others believe they formed a professional and personal bond while he still worked for the Government. What ever their bond is, we’re now aware that she’s among the few human beings that could give Reddington a tongue-lashing without repercussion. She also struck a nerve within him as he realized that it was indeed he who had let Liz and Agnes down.

Quickly seeing how Elizabeth reacted when Raymond entered the operating room, Mr. Kaplan ordered him to leave and then she talked with Liz, Tom and the surgeon Nick. Reddington likely feeling powerless for the first time in decades told Dembe he was going to get some air and apologized for yelling at his surrogate son earlier.

Just then an alarm sounded and Nick said that Liz was going into shock as some of the amniotic fluid had gotten into her bloodstream. Could it really be just a coincidence that this woman perfectly healthy before the conversation suddenly found herself fighting for her life? Or did Kate Kaplan suddenly concoct a scheme to make the world believe that Elizabeth Keen died? Did Mr. Kaplan react like a quarterback shaking off the play from the sidelines and draw a new plan in the dirt?

Solomon’s orders were to bring Keen to his new employer unharmed and alive, so if Liz died she’d obviously be of no use to the person who hired Matias. Even if TEAM-Red killed Solomon and every member of his squad, it would just be delaying the inevitable. Soon a second wave would arrive and they’d keep coming, condemning Lizzie and Agnes to a life always looking over their shoulders and always on the run. However if the employer believes Keen died the chase ends at least in the short-term.

If my theory’s correct, then only Mr. Kaplan, Liz, Tom and Nick know the truth, leaving Red, Dembe and the Task-Force in the dark. The less that know that vital information, the easier it will be to keep it contained. It also might explain why Tom didn’t attempt to rip Raymond’s head from his neck when he returned to the night-club.

This isn’t even the first time this season that the show attempted to fake Lizzie’s death. While Raymond and Lizzie were on the lam an episode opened with a flash-forward as Raymond had Mr. Kaplan take pictures to send to the media showing Keen’s seemingly lifeless body at the scene of a shootout. Last season contained a two-part episode in which Raymond got gunned down at the conclusion of the first episode and a sizable segment of the fans thought he might die.

Elizabeth Keen does have her detractors among the show’s fans, I’ve seen comments on Social-Media sites stating they hope the character actually died. She’s criticized for being whiney, ungrateful and always complaining and those attributes are certainly part of the character’s DNA. However for a character to have undergone the psychological damage that she’s endured since childhood and still become a profiler for the FBI is pretty impressive in this man’s opinion. She’s far from a perfect character, but each of these people we spend our Thursday nights with, have truckloads of baggage.

Although the series doesn’t get the ratings it did when it occupied the Monday night at 10:00 pm slot, it’s done what NBC hoped it could accomplish in their new time slot. The show derailed the former ABC juggernaut “Scandal,” as it came in ranked at 35, while the first installment of Mr. Solomon wound up in the 27th slot. The network announced weeks ago that the show’s been renewed for a fourth season and they will even attempt to launch a spinoff series revolving around Tom Keen.

Although Season Three has shaken up the dynamic, the series is still based around the premise that one of the most wanted criminals on the planet turns himself into the FBI in order to share information with a rookie profiler that he has some bond with stemming from her childhood. Without Liz Keen that equation vanishes, Raymond never turns himself in without Liz being involved. What ever their actual relationship turns out to be, Raymond thinks of Lizzie like his own daughter which is why his pain’s so intense. He looks at this as his greatest defeat, but he’ll realize why Mr. Kaplan did what she had to do when the truth gets revealed.

We would greatly miss many of the characters that we’ve grown to enjoy over the last three seasons, but there are just two characters that are integral to the plot. Without Raymond Reddington and/or Elizabeth Keen “The Blacklist,” simply doesn’t exist.

Photo: Courtesy Of FOX

Photo: Courtesy Of FOX

Warning: Spoiler Alert

“Paranoia strikes deep
Into your life it will creep
It starts when you’re always afraid
You step out of line, the man come and take you away.”

For What It’s Worth-Stephen Stills

Utopia: The perfect society; a place devoid of all the troubles that plague humanity; a land of contentment, free from  want and hardship and filled with friendship and love for each other. People have strived to reach or create such a society since the dawn of creation, but they never last for long. Are imperfect creatures capable of building a perfect society?

With just two episodes remaining in the FOX miniseries “Wayward Pines,” we’ve become aware that a sizable segment of the town, don’t truly feel they reside in “The Friendliest Place On Earth.” During episode eight, viewers found out that characters such as Ruby from the coffee-shop and Tim Bell the manager of the Wayward Pines Hotel, aren’t the compliant and passive people we assumed they were. Both were actively involved in the plan designed by Kate Hewson, to disable the electric fence surrounding the town and escape.

Dr. David Pilcher, the architect of  the ark that contains the only remaining humans in the year 4028, now finds himself fighting twin battles. The first being a growing segment of the residents of Wayward Pines that want answers. However the more pressing problem’s the one he’s not aware of yet, the fence has been breached and it’s just a matter of time until the Abbies cross that divide.

Pilcher realized that humanity would cease to exist within the next few hundred-years, back in the nineties and he set a plan in motion to repopulate the planet in Wayward Pines, Idaho. He then spent the next 15-years kidnapping people  and then putting them into a state of suspended animation, so they woke up over 2000 years later without physically aging a day. The new residents thought they’d been unconscious for hours, or perhaps as much as a day and most of them believe they still live in the 21st century.

When the residents awoke they found themselves with new lives and a fresh start, a needed second chance for many of them. They got new homes, new careers and even in some cases new significant others. In many ways it was a paradise, as long as the resident followed the rules, prominently displayed throughout the town:

Do Not Try To Leave.

Do Not Talk About The Past.

Do Not Discuss Your Life Before.

Always Answer The Phone If It Rings.

Work Hard And Be Happy

And Enjoy Your Life In Wayward Pines.

Those rules were not part of David Pilcher’s original vision for Wayward Pines. The current residents of the community, are referred to as “Group B,” because the people from the first group that got revived, couldn’t accept their new realities. The knowledge that they were the last survivors of humanity and the world they knew, ceased to exist two-thousand years earlier, created mass-panic. Residents either fled in panic and quickly became meals for the Abbies, or took their own lives. Determined that the second control-group not suffer the same fate, Pilcher established his wall of secrecy and eliminated anyone who threatened to peek behind the curtain.

There’s a different set of rules in effect for the children of the community, known as the First Generation Of Wayward Pines. They’re informed about their new realities by the Director of the Wayward Pines Academy, Dr. Megan Fisher. A hypnotherapist in our era, Fisher’s masterful in her ability to connect with disaffected teens such as Ben Burke. A young man that spent his lifetime on the outside looking in, he now feels loved and popular. There were no smiles for Theresa or Ethan Burke from their son, when they visited him in the hospital, however he met Megan’s arrival with an ear-to-ear grin.

Ben’s not only accepted his new life, he’s embraced it joyously. He’s got an adorable girlfriend named Amy and Fisher told him in the last episode, that he’s a hero having survived a terrorist attack and people are going to want to hear his opinions.

It’s further reinforcement of the bond she’s creating between the children and the state, further alienation of the child from the people who raise them. Your parents can’t handle the truth, we have your best interests at heart, the state in effect becomes the parent. It’s the same principles used in totalitarian societies throughout history, the Nazis, Stalin’s Soviet Union and the Cultural Revolution in China utilized the same tactics. If the people raising you are enemy’s of the state, then turn them in.

Megan quickly turned Ben against his father partially by picking at an old wound, surmising that Ethan may have been less lenient, had the suspect not been married to Kate Hewson. Fisher realized that Ben felt his father chose Hewson over his family when he had his affair with her. Fisher inferred that Ethan’s feelings for Hewson, nearly cost Ben his life.

We’re aware that Pilcher and his associates care deeply about the town’s children, but how much do they care about the adults. Pilcher wants compliance and things to run smoothly, his concerns with adults seem to be less about happiness and more about acceptance. To keep the placidity he’s trying to maintain in his town, he’s shown us that no measures are too extreme.

David’s sister Pamela interviews the staff of 24 volunteers that regulate the surveillance feeds. Although 23 members of the crew have no problems with the concept of eavesdropping, one man named Reggie Hudson admits to erasing comments that he attributed to fear. Then he looked Pamela in the eyes and said.

“These people are scared. I see them sobbing in their rooms, holding each other. They just don’t understand what became of their lives. It’s just human nature to ask questions.”

Surprisingly, the ever loyal Nurse Pam didn’t share that conversation with her brother. While she’s the first to call for a reckoning, she thinks it will send a bad message to the other volunteers if Reggie gets punished. David ignores her advice and buries the man, filling the tube he’s encased in with soil.

Whether Pilcher wants it or not, that wall of secrecy has collapsed now that the fence got disabled by the 30-foot dump-truck. It appears that the residents of Wayward Pines are going to find out the truth about their situation, sooner than later. Can they band together and defeat the Abbies, or is humanity doomed once again?

The Story Continues Thursday Night at 9:00 pm on FOX.

Images Courtesy of TNT and The History Channel

Images Courtesy of TNT and The History Channel

On this great American holiday that signifies the end of the old America and the beginning of the United States of America, I’d like to float a theory. The story of The Last Ship, is clearly one founded in fiction. However, there are some historical truths where we can easily draw comparisons. This is done in good fun and has not in any way been confirmed by anyone associated with the production of The Last Ship. There are some mild spoilers conceptually. If you have not seen all of the episodes to date, you have been warned.

Warning: Spoiler Alert

The first form of this analogy is obviously accomplished military service that parlay into being asked to be the first President and Commander-In-Chief of the new version of the country. As The Last Ship is first and foremost a story about a military ship and its crew trying desperately to save the world, the parallel begins there. In both cases, these respective men were charged in leading their men in a mission that would ultimately save their world. In George Washington’s case, the mission was to lead his army and defeat the British allowing the colonies to break from the oppressive rule of the British. In Chandler’s case, his mission was command the Nathan James in a mission to find a cure for the virus and prevent global extinction.

In some loose connection, both Chandler and Washington were men of Virginia. We know that Washington was a lifelong man of Virginia. The son of a wealthy family, Washington would eventually inherit his family estate in Mt. Vernon, Virginia. Eventually in the late 1750s, he would return home to Mt. Vernon under the assumption that he would live out the remainder of his life as a family man running said estate. What we know of Chandler, he was a resident of Virginia before commanding the Nathan James on the mission he still finds himself on. To my knowledge that could be as much about the Naval base in Norfolk and less about him being a man of Virginia. Either way, I’ll take the parallel.

Another parallel we can draw from is in the enemy itself. In Washington’s case, the enemy was the British. Conceptual or tangible. Everything stems from that. Protecting the people of the colonies from the tyrannical rule of the British. For Chandler, the enemy is any person or group that seeks to steal or destroy the cure. And by some extension preventing the cure from making its way to the people. And by that I mean all of the people. Whether it be the Russians in season 1, Amy Granderson’s plan to advance a chosen few, or this newest threat of the “chosen ones” Chandler fights to preserve the cure and the promise to deliver it to all. Which is not unlike Washington fighting against everything the British hoped to employ to maintain control over the colonies. All of the British legislation that pertained to the collection of taxes being the tip of the sword.

Where the analogy becomes speculative would naturally come either when Tom Chandler is asked to lead the army (loose term) or when the dust settles and the Nathan James has restored order amongst the chaos, asked to preside over this new version of our country as the Commander-In-Chief. In the most recent episode, we were given a tease to the former. The Nathan James arrives in Norfolk to find not only supplies, but military personnel. Pilots, Seals, and police. Before the episode is over, we get a small glimpse of Chandler commanding more than just the Nathan James. Orchestrating missions that sent out planes and personnel in various directions to secure these secret laboratories. In that moment, the seed was planted.

The more attractive theory is one, that at least I hope we are four or five seasons away from seeing materialize. That of course being, President Tom Chandler. It is clear that for the immediate future, Tom Chandler’s mission is ongoing. The finish line of protecting the cure and ensuring that they can save every last person possible is far from over. However, if we are to assume that Chandler and the Nathan James are able to complete that mission at some point and restore order and health to the world at large, the assumption is not that unrealistic. Not unlike George Washington leading armies against the British, essentially founding Guerrilla Warfare, and ensuring the safety of these ‘Americans’.

Insert the second Continental Congress. George Washington may not have been the driving force of the second Continental Congress of the likes of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Hancock or the Adams cousins (John And Samuel.) Which is probably the only way a similar notion could be floated for Tom Chandler. Shortly after the second Congress met, George Washington was appointed to General of the Continental Army. Similarly, I would assume that if the story lines move that far past the initial threat, that Chandler would also prefer to stay in the background until such a time as this new nation needs him to step up beyond his current responsibilities.

Citing the defeat at the Battle of Long Island, we can draw another slight comparison. George Washington was not undefeated. There were bumps in the road. The Battle of Long Island being maybe the most gruesome. While Chandler has not experienced (within the Last Ship series to this point) a defeat of that magnitude, his record is not without blemishes. Men and women under his command have been lost. Most laying down their lives for the mission. Some civilians lost in the crossfire. But clearly the Last Ship mission is not without casualties.

Washington’s failure in Philadelphia in 1777 did two things that may present themselves on the show. First, the defeat prompted Congress to consider removing Washington from Command. While there is no reason to believe currently that this is a story line in the works, I would not be surprised if it presented itself somewhere along the way. Twice now, we’ve seen an episode that at least flirted with the idea of the Nathan James sans Chandler. Losing him is not the prize. Having Chandler triumphant in a return might be.

Secondly, the notion of another nation joining the effort does seem like a real possibility. Following the defeat in Philadelphia, France joined in as allies to the American effort. Now we’ve seen that Russia has some semblance of a functioning army/navy. Yet in the most recent episode we discover that some of these laboratories are located in Europe. Potentially setting up some sort alliance between an established nation or nations (i.e. England, France, Germany, etc). Almost as if it were the inverse or absolute zero effect of the United States’ involvement in World War II. But that’s a reference for another time.

I wish I had a stronger case on this next point. Any discussion about George Washington cannot possibly leave out Valley Forge. In the timeline, Valley Forge is an epic ordeal. In the winter of 1777, it is believed that Washington lost as much as a third of his men to disease. The connection here is not the magnitude but the subject matter. Chandler, almost ironically, has not lost many of his crew to the disease in a literal sense. However, in means of effect, we can go back to the first season when Miller leans over to the female shipmate that died and says, “You were wrong, I’ll remember you” (or something to that effect). The numeric loss was small, but the impact of this crew staring at the lethality of the virus in real context was significant.

In the future there must be a final battle that signifies the end of one major act and the transition into another. The Battle at Yorktown may very well have been that moment for American and George Washington. The insurmountable blow that sends a clear message to the enemy, we have won and you have lost. Thus, marking the move to the next stage. For Washington, that meant eventually heading back to Mt. Vernon, but not permanently.

Going back home is also a nice tie-in although it completely ignores any sense of a timeline. Chandler too goes back home. This we’ve already seen and therefore more or less doesn’t fit. But for about 10 minutes of screen time, Chandler flirts with and makes a decision to stay in Norfolk, resign his commission and be there for his children. Which is also short-lived. Chandler’s father makes it very clear that his duty to the mission and his men takes priority. A notion I’m sure was passed along to Washington and in no small part contributed to Washington’s decision to return.

Now for the elephant in the room. A number of sources cite that the concept of the President as depicted by the Constitutional Convention, was done so with George Washington specifically in mind. Does anyone who follows The Last Ship believe for a second that Tom Chandler is not the image of Commander-In-Chief? Especially as it pertains to what he’s done, what he may plan to do, and what we as Americans would want from the leader of this new United States?

Does anyone think that Tom Chandler could not transition smoothly into that role. Sensitive to issues of national security? Foreign policy whether militarily or otherwise? The economy of a new or rebuilt nation might take some doing, but hopefully along the way, survivors educated and well versed in that department would be found an brought into the fold. Everything that embodies the character of Tom Chandler also embodies the character and virtue most Americans would hope to find in the President of the New United States of America.

While none of this is supported or confirmed by anyone of note, it’s not as far-fetched as it may sound. Whether we are talking about the struggle and conflict to preserve the goal at hand, or the actual events that define the great American remember George Washington to be. Both of these men, one fictional and one very real, seem to be cut from the same cloth. So as we celebrate this Day of Independence and look forward to tomorrows episode, “Solace” sit back and ask yourself:

“Is CDR Tom Chancellor the New America’s George Washington?”

Courtesy of TNT

Courtesy of TNT

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Warning: Spoiler Alert

Fans of the FOX network miniseries “Wayward Pines,” witnessed back-to-back mind-blowing episodes in chapters five and six, of this ten-part production. The fifth episode entitled “The Truth,” revealed that the town of Wayward Pines, existed in year 4028 long after humanity had ceased to exist. Episode six explained in detail how Dr. David Pilcher and his sister Pamela, put together his plan to restore humanity in our planet’s distant future.

Pilcher along with a security guard he employed Arnold Pope, turned to kidnapping to populate humanity’s new home, starting with a brilliant physician that lost his medical license for prescribing too much Oxycontin. Pilcher tells Pope that he’s giving second chances to people who deserve them, including Pope himself.

The kidnappings seemed to have gone on for 15-years, as we know Beverly got kidnapped in 1999 and they were still occurring in 2014. That was also the year that Pamela, Pope, Megan Fisher and Pilcher put themselves into suspended animation through the cryonics process. They were the first revived and then decided who would become members of their first control-group to populate Wayward Pines.

After watching the fifth episode, I was convinced that there had to be a bridge that connected Wayward Pines to our era. How else could Pilcher have had two conversations with Ethan Burke’s boss Adam Hassler in 2014? How could Sheriff Arnold Pope have gotten Burke’s wife Theresa and his son Ben into Wayward Pines. When Pilcher tells Ethan that he underwent the cryonics process in 2014, my first thought was perhaps those events took place before Pilcher took his 2000-year nap.

However about 24-hours after watching the telecast Thursday night, I realized that the David Pilcher that had those two conversations with Adam Hassler, wasn’t the shaggy-haired younger version of Pilcher that went to sleep in 2014. In both those conversations, Pilcher appeared as he does in 4028 losing his hair and with far more lines on his face. Which leads me to the conclusion that a bridge from Wayward Pines to our era, does indeed exist and possibly hiding out in plain-sight.

A new element to the story got introduced in “Choices,” the existence of “Lot 33.” To the naked-eye “Lot-33” looks like a plot of undeveloped land with a chain-link fence around it. However the plot’s right in the middle of town and we find out the victim of the last reckoning Peter McCall thought there was more to the lot than met the eye. Could “Lot 33” be where that bridge to our era exists and if so, how does one utilize it?

To be certain, a bridge from 4028 is a far-fetched notion, but this is a series that’s based on far-fetched notions, that humanity will start it’s fall in just 80-years and that our species has been supplanted by the mutant Abbies. So accepting all that, would a bridge between eras be that much more of a stretch?

We’ve seen the older version of David Pilcher in 2014, the question remains how did he get there. I’ve not read any of the novels in the series and have steered clear of any spoiler-articles, so this is pure conjecture on my part. However until given a better explanation, I’m thinking this is indeed a credible theory.

The Story Continues Thursday Night at 9:00 pm on FOX.

Photo Courtesy Of ITV and The London Daily Mail

Photo Courtesy Of ITV and The London Daily Mail

WARNING: MULTIPLE SPOILER ALERTS!

The FOX miniseries “Gracepoint,” while not performing particularly well in the ratings, has intrigued our readers at “Not Just Another TV Site,” so much, we could make a strong argument, that we’re the show’s unofficial website. The tale of the Northern California seaside village, searching for the killer of 12-year-old Danny Solano, has proven that it attracts the most readers for us. We’re very pleased that we’ve become the “Go-To Website,” for the series that’s heated up dramatically over the last few episodes, with only three episodes remaining, before Danny’s killer’s revealed.

It’s possible you’re unaware, that Gracepoint’s based on a British TV series that ran on the ITV Network, entitled “Broadchurch,” that also starred David Tennant, who portrays Detective Emmett Carver, in the American version. He played Detective Inspector Alec Hardy and the 12-year-old boy’s named Danny Latimer, but many of the other characters retain the same names in both series, chief among them Detective Sergeant Ellie Miller.

The show-runners and Tennant, stated that they’re using a different character as the murderer in Gracepoint, than they did in Broadchurch, probably to keep viewers of the original intrigued, as well as giving themselves the challenge of telling the story a different way, besides the vast difference in locales. Danny Latimer got strangled and was found on the beach, but hadn’t been in the water. There was no blood, or boat involved.

Although I’ve yet to watch Broadchurch, in the interest of our readers, I went to the “Daily Mail” website, to find out who killed Danny Latimer, to rule the character out of murdering Danny Solano. Having only viewed the American version, I got quite shocked, whom the killer in the UK version is; it’s Joe Miller, father of two boys and the husband of Detective Sergeant Ellie Miller.

The finale revealed that Miller fell in love with the boy and they had met for several months giving each other hugs, but there was no sexual contact, a fact confirmed by the forensic team. Apparently, Miller bought Danny another phone and gave the boy 500 dollars, hoping the gifts would win Latimer’s love. However, Danny threatened to reveal their relationship and Miller panicked and strangled the boy, then left his dead body on the beach. When Ellie found out she physically attacked her husband, throwing him to the ground and kicking him.

Photo Courtesy Of ITV and The London Daily Mail

Photo Courtesy Of ITV and The London Daily Mail

So, knowing that Gracepoint’s Joe Miller didn’t kill Danny Solano, with three episodes remaining, who actually did kill the 12-year-old boy? After viewing the miniseries’ seventh episode on Thursday, although the focus centered on Ellie and Joe Miller’s son Tommy’s disappearance, possible clues got revealed, though this series isn’t adverse to planting things to throw viewers off the trail, as we witnessed with “Captain Jack” Reinhold. Lets take a look at possible suspects, that might have taken the young boy’s life. I’m ruling out San Francisco Globe reporter Renee Clemons, even though she’s the only other person than Carver involved in Rosemont and Gracepoint. Although I think she’s out to get Carver, it’s pretty far-fetched to think she’s the killer. Our list will go from least suspicious,to most suspicious:

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Raymond Connelly: “Mr. Telephone Man’s” certainly strange, even if he never told you about the voices he hears from some-sort of Spirit Master. But unless, he’s completely psychotic, he’s drawn too much attention to himself, in my book he’s the least likely suspect.

Photo Credit: Ed Araquel/FOX

Photo Credit: Ed Araquel/FOX

Lars Pierson: The backpacker returned from his hike in the past episode and he definitely runs on a different wave length than the rest of us. He also happened to return, the day Tommy went missing, but I don’t look at him as a suspect in either incident. He recalled his conversation with Danny, for Detective Emmett Carver and seemed to sound true. Although Pierson’s got mental demons that he refuses to medicate away, he seems too gentle a soul in his present state to take another life.

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Susan Wright: She puts the Creepy in “Creepy Town,” along with others in the village. Susan Wright, might actually be Ruth Ehrlich, a name that came up when Gemma Fisher ran her Social Security number, when Wright applied at the Inn for part-time work. She threatened the village paper’s editor Kathy Eaton, that she knew men who would rape her and the only person she’s connected with is Tommy Miller. She’s playing some sort of game of cat and mouse game with Vince Novik, seemingly she was smoking where Danny’s body washed up on the shore. There’s possibly at least a degree of involvement in the boy’s death.

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Reverend Paul Coates: Creepy’s also an excellent adjective to describe the village’s Spiritual Counselor, as Coates behavior’s extremely off-putting. While hesitant to bring up molesting young boys by Catholic Priests, the fact’s are that we’ve found out it went on mainly unchecked for far too long. Carver seems to think that Coates is the guilty party and next episode may center around the Reverend.

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Photo Courtesy Of FOX

Vince Novik: If forced to make a guess at this point, Mark Solano’s assistant would end up as my choice. Although he’s got an alibi for the night of Danny’s murder, it’s based on the memory of his mother, who suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease, making her statement unreliable. He’s done something that Susan Wright’s threatening about, although it could be a separate incident. In the past episode he had blood on his hands and face after Tommy went missing and his mother asked, why he was in trouble again? He’s got a habit of looking around suspiciously, every time he enters or exits his workshop and keeps the gate closed with a padlock. He also was the main instigator, in the village turning on Jack Reinhold.

The Story Continues Next Thursday on FOX at 10:00 pm.